To Share or not to Share?

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After a major professional development event, I try to blog my takeaways as my way of reflecting and committing to action steps. But with #OURHive I’m hesitant. I know as an attendee of many jealously camps, I appreciate such blogs as a way to collect resources discovered and shared at the event I was not fortunate enough to attend. So why the hesitation? It may be because I don’t consider a session I facilitated a session that is worthy of comment. But of course it is. It’s just a private reflection for now. I do have a couple things I’m ready to share though.

When I attend a major PD, I tend to notice a main word or concept. I’m struggling with that too though. My immediate reaction is “organic” tying that to the ungroomed responses we want from students. That stands in contrast to formulated responses of years gone by expected from learners who are given formulas, aka recipes, into which numbers are plugged and answers are spat out. In our quest for conceptual understanding we expect raw, unfinished ideas, ripe with unfinished truths and misconceptions. Teachers are in search of organic “mather” that can be synthesized into understandings that form a platform from which the next concept can be launched. Words are simple. Actions are complex, intertwined and squishy as we persevere toward the learning goals of the day. Skillfully executed, lesson synthesis brings connections and closure to the day.

I have a problem though. #OURHive left me with more than one key word. Shiny has to be crowned the second key word. Because I missed the opening keynotes due to getting my room ready for my session, I picked up on the word late in the game. I heard it used frequently though and I interpreted it in my own way. I took it to mean teachers shine when they do well and they become even more shiny as they improve. I can’t help but be reminded of a time in a previous career when I was told I was a “diamond in the rough.” I was not shiny whatsoever. The comment made me feel as though they had told me I didn’t sweat much for a fat girl. This is different though. The pretext is that teachers are already shining. Their new work and new learnings just help them shine ever more. That’s a nice thought.

I will compile the nuggets of information and teaching tips I received in another post. Until then, don’t seek illusive perfection, but rather continual improvement. Teach on. Learn on. Love on.

 

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